I can’t believe the amount of people I know who turn their nose up at free books.

wilsonlibunc:

“Knowlege Wins. Public Library Books Are Free.” American Library Association poster published during World War I. From Documenting the American South, “North Carolinians and the Great War.” I can’t believe the amount of people I know who turn their nose up at free books.

wilsonlibunc:

Knowlege Wins. Public Library Books Are Free.” American Library Association poster published during World War I. From Documenting the American South, “North Carolinians and the Great War.”

(via koolreadz)

gimpnelly:

frankenlincoln:

gimpnelly:

askmaridee:

I took a couple of hours out of my day to be on a panel for Young Author’s Day, an event put on by the Pacific Northwest Writer’s Association. I was invited to join by John Lustig, who I feel very lucky to call my friend and mentor. We answered the usual questions about the writing process and how we broke into comics, but I was even more intrigued by the audience. Notice something about them?
Yeah. GIRLS. Very. Young. Girls.
So I asked THEM some questions. “How many of you read comics?”
All hands went up.
"How many of you want to make comics some day?"
Most of the hands went up.
Here’s where it really got interesting. “How many of you BUY comics?”
Only one hand raised. I asked her where she buys her comics. She said, “At the comic book store.”
"Do you have a comic book store you like going to?" I asked.
She hesitated. “It’s complicated.”
That’s 10 year-old speak for “I have to go there to get comics but the store makes me uncomfortable.” The rest of them read webcomics. None of them had heard of Comixology before, but they knew all about it by the time the panel was over. What comic would they like to see most? Minecraft. Only Steve needs to be a girl.
It was a fascinating experience, especially in the wake of this article detailing why girls in the 1980s (like me and one of the moms nodding eagerly in the audience) stopped buying comics for 20 years.
The future of comics is bright indeed.

This is absolutely wonderful.

The part where the girl says she feels uncomfortable in the comic shop she goes to upsets me.

Me too, Brian. That was the kind of experience I had literally 20 years ago when I went into my first shop. I didn’t go back into a shop for 8 years and only then because I was coaxed and accompanied. I hate that it’s STILL happening. 

gimpnelly:

frankenlincoln:

gimpnelly:

askmaridee:

I took a couple of hours out of my day to be on a panel for Young Author’s Day, an event put on by the Pacific Northwest Writer’s Association. I was invited to join by John Lustig, who I feel very lucky to call my friend and mentor. We answered the usual questions about the writing process and how we broke into comics, but I was even more intrigued by the audience. Notice something about them?

Yeah. GIRLS. Very. Young. Girls.

So I asked THEM some questions. “How many of you read comics?”

All hands went up.

"How many of you want to make comics some day?"

Most of the hands went up.

Here’s where it really got interesting. “How many of you BUY comics?”

Only one hand raised. I asked her where she buys her comics. She said, “At the comic book store.”

"Do you have a comic book store you like going to?" I asked.

She hesitated. “It’s complicated.”

That’s 10 year-old speak for “I have to go there to get comics but the store makes me uncomfortable.” The rest of them read webcomics. None of them had heard of Comixology before, but they knew all about it by the time the panel was over. What comic would they like to see most? Minecraft. Only Steve needs to be a girl.

It was a fascinating experience, especially in the wake of this article detailing why girls in the 1980s (like me and one of the moms nodding eagerly in the audience) stopped buying comics for 20 years.

The future of comics is bright indeed.

This is absolutely wonderful.

The part where the girl says she feels uncomfortable in the comic shop she goes to upsets me.

Me too, Brian. That was the kind of experience I had literally 20 years ago when I went into my first shop. I didn’t go back into a shop for 8 years and only then because I was coaxed and accompanied. I hate that it’s STILL happening. 

(via mrdqj)

royalbks:

The Outsider and Others | H.P. Lovecraft | 1939
First Edition. The first publication from Arkham House and first collection of Lovecraft’s stories, published posthumously, which would go on to not only to have an enormous influence on horror fiction, but on film and music as well. Very Good plus in an about Very Good dust jacket. Light bumps to the top corners, and a slight lean. Jacket is rubbed, with light toing to the spine and rear panel, with chips and tears overall. Still, a mostly presentable example of the scarce dust jacket.

royalbks:

The Outsider and Others | H.P. Lovecraft | 1939

First Edition. The first publication from Arkham House and first collection of Lovecraft’s stories, published posthumously, which would go on to not only to have an enormous influence on horror fiction, but on film and music as well.

Very Good plus in an about Very Good dust jacket. Light bumps to the top corners, and a slight lean. Jacket is rubbed, with light toing to the spine and rear panel, with chips and tears overall. Still, a mostly presentable example of the scarce dust jacket.

(via thelifeguardlibrarian)

nprbooks:

pickeringtonlibrary:

ridgelibteens:

patrondebris:

pickeringtonlibrary:

We might have mentioned before how much we love science fiction, and the fact that this year’s summer reading theme is Science. Actually: Science!! It needs an exclamation point. 

So, we’ve put together a really, really, incredibly huge booklist (working title? The Hive) for fans of science and fantasy fiction - and we added a little something extra, since, if you’re anything like us, when you love reading a genre, you love to watch films and shows, and play video games, in that same genre. 

And if you’re playing Reading Bingo this summer with us for Summer Reading - or if you’re planning to take part in our Summer Fling (With a Book)! matchmaking program - then these books will definitely see you through summer and beyond!

I like this format a lot.

Totally stealing this for displays in our Teen Center.

Hahaha, steal away!  And add to it!  If we’d had more room, we would have added more books, trust us. :)  

Have we mentioned before how much we love the Pickerington Library? Well, it bears repeating. Also, if you haven’t read READY PLAYER ONE, go do it. RIGHT NOW.

(via koolreadz)

usfspecialcollections:

The Allies’ Fairy Book, with illustrations by Arthur Rackham.

Published in 1916, this collection features fairy tales from the Allied nations of WWI, including England, Wales, France, Scotland, Serbia, Russia, and Ireland.

(via koolreadz)

whatthecool:

The Grand Budapest Hotel entirely made out of LEGOS!

It took 575 hours for Ryan Ziegelbauer and his team of eight model builders to create this beauty. 

(via rocketangelcupcakerobot)

Gaming enthusiast, youth/children's librarian, artist, craftsperson, and world explorer.

twitter.com/8bitstate

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